Learning from old Hawaiian newpapers

Can you kokua? We haven’t posted here for some time, but here’s an activity I think citizens and honorary citizens of Ka Lahui Hawaii can get behind.

A call for volunteers to type, in simple text manuscript form, pages from old Hawaiian language newspapers so that the content can be searchable with a computer was issued in late November 2011. The project, called the “ʻIke Kūʻōkoʻa Initiative,” is seeking 200,000 volunteer hours. As you may know, more than 100 Hawaiian language newspapers were published between 1834 and 1948.

If you have heard about this project and are anxious to help, please visit www.awaiaulu.org, scroll down, and hear the welcoming invitation from Kaui Sai-Dudoit and Puakea Nogelmeier. If you sign on and decide later it’s not for you, you can always cancel.

Although it’s true that one doesn’t need to speak Hawaiian to type it, it is an advantage. In addition, good eyesight, squinting, accurate typing, copyreading skills, and time = Success. Mahalo!

Posted by Rebekah

Akaka Bill: now what

A bill in this year’s Hawaii State Legislature relating to [Hawaiian] government—brackets are mine—is moving fast, I learned today, now headed for the House Finance committee and the Senate Ways and Means committee. It is H.B. No. 1627 H.D. 2 and the companion S.B. No. 1520 S.D.2.

Critics call it “the ‘Jr.-Boy Akaka bill’  offshoot (modified for implementation by the State instead of the Federal government).”

As of Wednesday, the Senate Ways and Means Committee has scheduled a public decision making for Feb. 25, 2011, 9:00 a.m. in conference room 211, State Capitol.

To read and track the bills and to submit testimony, go to:

http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2011/lists/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=HB&billnumber=1627

and

http://www.capitol.hawaii.gov/session2011/lists/measure_indiv.aspx?billtype=SB&billnumber=1520

The committee chairs are:

Rep. Marcus R. Oshiro
Chair House Finance Committee
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 306
phone: 808-586-6200
fax: 808-586-6201
repmoshiro@Capitol.hawaii.gov

Sen. David Y. Ige
Senate Ways and Means Committee
Hawaii State Capitol, Room 215
phone: 808-586-6230
fax: 808-586-6231
sendige@Capitol.hawaii.gov

Posted by Rebekah

Kue petition revisited

A peaceful demonstration to inform the public about the petitions protesting the annexation of the Hawaiian nation to the United States in 1897 by Hawaiian nationals was held Monday, Feb. 21, at the statue of U.S. President William McKinley, the statue of President McKinley holding a “Treaty of Annexation” that never was.

You may read the story and view photos at http://www.hawaiianindependencealliance.org/category/eventsactions/

The petitions against annexation were circulated by Hui Kalaiaina, Hui Aloha Aina for Men, and Hui Aloha Aina for Women. At the time the population was less than 40,000. More than 38,000 signatures are on the combined petitions, indicating overwhelming opposition. In 1997 the petitions were retrieved from the U.S. National Archives in Washington, D.C., and brought back to Hawaii by Noenoe K. Silva who informed present-day Native Hawaiians of their ancestors’ position.

You may read Dr. Silva’s findings at http://libweb.hawaii.edu/digicoll/annexation/pet-intro.html

Posted by Rebekah

Hauoli Makahiki Hou!

Best wishes to our citizens and readers for the new year 2011.

Posted by Rebekah

Lono i ka Makahiki!

Aloha! Pehea oe? Recall that Makahiki season is here! In Hawaii citizens still observe the festival that runs roughly from mid-October to mid-February. Check the sky at night, and you’ll see the Makalii constellation (Pleiades) overhead at 8 p.m. Work is pau, the food has been harvested. People play sports, play games, have ceremonies honoring Lono, the god of agriculture and harvesting. Warring ceases; the time of Ku is passed. Many other indigenous cultures observe this time of year similarly as winter approaches and families visit and entertain each other with good relaxing times.

Today my ohana plans to attend Makahiki Festivities at Queen Liliuokalani Children’s Center, 53-516 Kamehameha Highway, in Punaluu, Oahu. Protocol began at sunrise, so we’ve missed that. However, the games for all ages begin at 9 a.m., and they are open to the public. I suggest you find out what might be going on in your area, or come to Punaluu, or organize some festivities yourself. Enjoy!

Posted by Rebekah  

Healing our spirit worldwide

You might like the “Healing Our Spirit Worldwide – The Sixth Gathering” on Oahu now until September 10, 2010. The welcome ceremony took place today. A festival at Waimea Valley on Oahu is on tap for Sept. 4, and opening ceremonies are scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 5, at Kualoa Park, Oahu. Conference sessions start Sept. 6 at the Hawaii Convention Center, Kalakaua avenue and Kapiolani boulevard. Registration fees apply, the same for one day or one week, but inquire about discounts. Please click on the underscored link above for all the information.

Posted by Rebekah

Native-Hawaiian-made films

Just alerting readers of the Oiwi Film Festival opening today at The Honolulu Academy of Arts Doris Duke Theatre. It features the collective voices of Native Hawaiian filmmakers and runs through May 26. Tickets are affordable at $8 with a dollar off for students, seniors and military. If you’re a member of the Academy of Arts, five bucks gets you in. The programmers grouped the films into several themes:

Na alakai o Hawaii nei — Those who lead us in Hawaii
Ka malama ana i ka aina — Caring for our land
Ka pilina o ka poe Hawaii i ke kai — Hawaiians’ relationship to the sea
Ka ea Hawaii —Sovereignty
Na moolelo pokole — Short stories
Na hula o Hawaii — Hula, dance of Hawaii
Ka hoohanohano ana i ko kakou mau kupuna — Honoring our ancestors

Do check the schedule for which films are showing when. There are 19 short subjects and features. I found a comprehensive news-feature article and film festival schedule by reporter Gary C.W. Chun on the following link:

http://www.starbulletin.com/features/20100502_their_views.html

If you go, you can post your film review here to share. Click on “Leave a comment.”

Posted by Rebekah

Good list of links on our blogroll

To ease your search for information about more Native Hawaiian activities, see our blogroll in the sidebar at right (scroll down). Ka Huli Ao already provides a comprehensive list of resources, so start there. Mahalo!

Posted by Rebekah

Ka Lahui Hawaii’s master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty

A master plan for Hawaiian sovereignty prepared by the Ka Lahui Hawaii Mokuna (elected legislature) in 1994 can now be read on this website. Click on the “Hookupu Master Plan” tab above.

I am proud to say I was present in Keaukaha at that legislative session to witness how brilliantly the citizens crafted the document and how hard they worked. It was awesome to experience collaboration and hear the vision of Native Hawaiians so passionately articulated.

It marked a turning point for Ka Lahui Hawaii, because, as it states on page 1, Ka Lahui Hawaii gifted this plan “for future work in many political and community spheres and to propose a process of consensus building which can meet the needs of the many sovereign groups in Hawaii.” “Hookupu” means “offering.”

Now, 15 years later, here it is again, offered and accessible on the internet. I hope you will take time to read it.

Posted by Rebekah

117th anniversary of the overthrow

This weekend marks the 117th anniversary of the overthrow of the Hawaiian kingdom. I expect Sovereignty Sunday activities in observation of the sad event at Iolani Palace and neighboring areas, but I have details of only one. If you know of anything else, please leave a comment. Click on the link below for the flyer and information about “Onipaa – Aloha Aina, Malama Aina Art & Poetry Exhibit.” Hawaiian studies professor and activist Haunani-Kay Trask is the scheduled keynote speaker at Saturday’s opening event.

ONIPAA 01 10 10 (3) (2)

Posted by Rebekah