One of many remembrances of Haunani-Kay Trask

Dear Beloved Ka Lahui Hawai’i,

I send my condolences on the loss of Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask. I was one of her students (and I believe one of her first, if not her first student, to go onto get a Ph.D.). I was nurtured and mentored by Dr. Trask and Dr. David E. Stannard throughout my undergraduate & graduate studies as well as my career. 

I feel both a sense of deep sorrow and heartfelt gratitude to my forever kumu, Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask.

I wrote a tribute for her on my department’s website. I will be publishing a much longer version of this tribute in our department’s newsletter. I would not be where I am today without the love and mentorship of both Dr. Haunani-Kay Trask and Dr. David E. Stannard.

https://www.csun.edu/humanities/asian-american-studies

My heart is heavy, but I know Dr. Trask’s powerful work lives on.

Thank you.

With love, gratitude and solidarity,
Teresa Williams León
Professor of Asian American Studies
California State University Northridge
and forever, Haunani-Kay’s student

Haunani-Kay Trask (1949-2021)

We love you our great kumu, leader, and voice for our Lāhui! Uē nā lani.
Haunani-Kay Trask October 3, 1949 – July 3, 2021.

________

The Nation mourns the passing of Haunani-Kay Trask, a Native Daughter whose legacy lives on with each generation that continues to Kū’ē: oppose, resist, or protest colonialism through the advancement of sovereignty and self-determination in Hawai’i.  We offer our deepest condolences to her ‘ohana, haumāna, and the many lives she touched around the world.  Whether she was speaking before an audience here or abroad or signing a book, she would say or write: Kū’ē, Kū’ē, Kū’ē.

Lehua Kinilau, Kiaʻāina

Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi

Letter to the U.S. Senate Committee on Indian Affairs

Tap on the link to view the letter dated March 31, 2021.

Cast your vote



The State of Hawaiʻi votes by mail in 2020. Voters will be mailed a ballot 18 days prior to Election Day. The Primary Election will be held August 8, 2020, and the General Election will be held November 3, 2020.
Now is a good time to familiarize yourself with the candidates and their platforms.
The Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee has published its KOHO PONO report card in the Ka Wai Ola newspaper of the Office of Hawaiian Affairs. You may also find it at the website kalahuihawaiipoliticalactioncommittee.net.
This report card gives letter grades to legislators for the way they voted on issues that affect Hawaiians. It also contains legislators’ comments beyond a yes or no answer to questions posed by KPAC.
Are you registered?
To register to vote, or to update your information, go to the website https://elections.hawaii.gov/.
The deadline to register is July 9, 2020, for the Primary and October 5, 2020, for the General.
Many races have multiple candidates, and only some candidates will advance to the general.  If people don’t vote for their preferred candidates In the Primary Election, they might not make it to the General Election.
Campaigns for these political races are ongoing:
  • National (U.S.)
  • Congressional (HawaiʻI) Senate and House of Representatives
  • State
  • Mayoral (Kauaʻi, Oʻahu, Maui, Hawaiʻi)
  • City Council & Country Council
  • Prosecutor
  • Office of Hawaiian Affairs
According to Leiānuenue Niheu, chair of the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee:
“We have aloha for everyone running for public office in the upcoming Primary Election 2020. The personal testimony submission, endorsement, support, kakoʻo, balota of the individual members of the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee do not reflect the opinions, actions and positions of the Officers of the Ka Lāhui Hawaiʻi Political Action Committee, and the Steering Committee members, a.k.a. KLH Ke Komike Kalaiaina. KPAC does not endorse any candidate, but it does offer information.”
~ Rebekah Luke

All Hawaiʻi, stand together

Our people singing on Mauna Kea

Hauʻoli Makahiki 2019

Healani Sonoda-Pale is the chair of the Ka Lāhui Hawai‘i Political Action Committee. Here we repost her recap of 2018 and welcome to the Year of the Kanaka Maoli:

Pele returned to Puna and cleaned house, a few nights ago Poliahu laid her mantle on Mauna Kea, it has been 200 years since King Kamehameha’s passing, the US federal government is shut down with no end in sight, and the Natives are restless.

Welcome to the YEAR OF THE KANAKA MAOLI!

Looking back this is what I can remember of 2018 being out and active in the Kanaka Maoli community:

1. Ma Hope Mākou o Lili’uokalani March was Aloha ‘Āina until politicians were allowed to cut in front Ma Mua of our Queens Portrait.
2. Ka Lāhui Hawaii’s Political Action Committee (KPAC) held its first Kanaka Maoli Priorities workshop at the leg and held 3 Navigating the leg workshops in the communities
3. Helped kill Senate bill 3090 on the Mauna Kea Authority, the kuleana Land bill almost passes, KPAC helps introduce a criminal justice reform reso, and all but one measure transferring out public lands aka Kanaka National Lands dies.
4. KPAC’s 2018 Legislative Report Card reaches over 66,000 households.
5. TMT becomes an issue in the elections and candidates are asked if they would be willing to call the National Guard on “Protesters” on Mauna Kea.
6. Celebrated Lā Ho’iho’i Ea in the Hawaiian Kingdom Park with no permit and Celebrated the Queens Birthday at the Palace and Lā Kū’oko’a with Waimānalo.
7. Attended my first Democratic Party Convention with KPAC and spoke in favor of a more progressive platform with broader support of sovereignty for Kanaka (not just fed wreck). The platform passed.
8. Helped organized with Kanaka Maoli and supporters in Hawai’i and in Mokuhonu to protect “Aloha” in the No Aloha Poke Co movement and intellectual property rights.
9. Helped to rebuild an Auwai from Kānewai Punawai go Paiko fishpond with my son’s and community.
10. My husband and I won a contested case to stop a short term housing rental in East Molokai.
11. Helped organize the first Pupuhi/Pale/Apana Reunion in Kamalō, Molokai.
12. Worked with other scholars to voice our concerns about The Rock making a movie about our sacred King Kamehameha.
13. The Supreme Court decision came out supporting the DLNR permit. Organized with UH Staff and Faculty and Mauna Kea Hui for further actions.
14. Helped give voice to Kūpuna salt makers in Kaua’i.

~ Healani Sonoda-Pale

Vote today in the general election

Hawaii has same-day registration. Anyone 18 or older may simply go to the polling place to register (if you aren’t already) and vote. Remember to bring an ID. That’s it! Polls are open until 6 p.m. As a reminder, voting for the Office of Hawaiian Affairs is open to all.

175th Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea at Thomas Square

Hawaiian National Position Statement on Thomas Square

Thomas Square holds historical and political significance for Hawaiians. This is where the 5-month occupation of the Hawaiian Kingdom, by the British, ended on July 31, 1843, when Admiral Thomas of the British Government ordered the Union Jack lowered and the Hawaiian Kingdom flag to be raised. The park is named in honor of him.

That was also on the day that King Kamehameha III proclaimed: “Ua Mau Ke Ea O Ka ‘Āina I Ka Pono,” which translates to mean the “Sovereignty of the Land is Perpetuated in Righteousness.”

Since then, July 31st has been a Hawaiian Kingdom national holiday known as Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea. And it was celebrated by Hawaiians here and abroad until the United States illegally took control of Hawai’i via a Joint Resolution of Congress. Today, Hawaiians refer to the 1898 US takeover as an illegal occupation because no Treaty of Annexation exists, which is the only document that could legitimize the American presence here, as prescribed under US and International law.
Since 1986, Hawaiian Nationals and Patriots have gathered here annually to assert and affirm the sovereignty of the Hawaiian Nation with no permits or permission from either the so called “State of Hawaiʻi” or the “City and County of Honolulu”. It continued that way until 2017 when “joint control, maintenance, and management” of this politically historic park was transferred over to the Department of Enterprise Services (DES), a private money generating corporation, despite strong community opposition and no consultation with the Kanaka Maoli people.

With million-dollar condominiums going up near Thomas Square this park is set to become a jewel in the crown of the surrounding real estate. And now 175 years after it was first designated as the first Hawaiian Kingdom park, where Hawaiians honor the sovereignty and righteousness of the land, it is finally getting a facelift from the City and County of Honolulu and DES.

Historic events like Lā Hoihoi Ea are being tokenized as cultural events intended to enhance the value of Thomas Square by engaging the community with art and entertainment. Today Hawaiian Nationals have to sign a permit and get a million-dollar insurance coverage indemnifying all parties involved including the occupying government, the City and County of Honolulu, to celebrate Hawaiian Restoration Day. Thomas Square was created by the Hawaiian Kingdom Privy Council to memorialize and celebrate the sovereignty of our Nation and today it is a symbol of our sovereignty as Kanaka Maoli and Hawaiian Nationals over this archipelago.

In conclusion, we must reject any claims that the State of Hawaiʻi, City and County of Honolulu, and the DES own or control this Hawaiian National Park and REFUSE to sign any permit or permission slip to use the lands that our King established me ke aloha nui no ko kākou Lāhui (with love for our Hawaiian Nation).

Kanaka Maoli, Hawaiian Nationals and Patriots of the Hawaiian Kingdom, hold your ground here at the piko (the center) of what is now a widespread celebration that extends throughout the islands and on Moku Honu (the Continent). It is important to STAND. If we can’t even hold down a park, how can we be pono (righteous) in stating that that our Kingdom still lives?

— Healani Sonoda-Pale

KPAC releases report card, shows how State legislators fared

Ka Lahui Hawai‘i Political Action Committee (KPAC) announces the publication of its 3rd KOHO PONO Legislative Report Card in the July 2018 issue of the Ka Wai Ola (OHA’s monthly newsletter).  The Report Card is also available for download on the KPAC website at this link.  KOHO PONO means to Elect or Choose Wisely by making an informed decision when voting for an elected official to represent your voice.  It’s important that Kanaka Maoli voters know how elected officials voted in 2018​ ​on key issues that impact our community.

The 2018 KOHO PONO Legislative Report Card focuses on important bills from this past State Legislative Session and its overall impact to the Hawaiian community. KPAC monitored and provided testimony on a number of legislative measures dealing with ceded lands, Hawaiian education and language, Mauna Kea and Hawai`i’s precious environment. In addition, we ran several social media education campaigns on specific bills in order to heighten informed awareness and garner greater civic participation to directly address its cultural, social, political and economic impacts.

The Report Card spotlights several bills that attempt to address public lands from the ceded lands trust, aka “stolen Hawaiian lands” by providing a voting record matrix on how each legislator voted from both the Senate and House. The community will be able to use the Report Card as a voting tool when deciding upon who they should vote for in the coming 2018 Election.

KPAC member and long time Mauna Kea Kia`i (protector) Kealoha Pisciotta, when asked to share her thoughts about participating in the State’s legislative process, states, “We kanaka need to engage in the political process to help create a better, just, Pono, healthy and beautiful world.”  She goes on to say, “Don’t be afraid of how things look, just get involved and help to make the change. Have hope in Aloha and be willing to move Aloha at every opportunity.”

The Report Card also highlights responses to questions by the 2018 Hawai`i Gubernatorial candidates to provide clarity on their individual positions on Hawaiian issues. KPAC does not endorse any political candidates. Our mission is to inform our community on impactful legislative matters.

~ Healani Sonoda-Pale, kalahuihawaiipoliticalactioncommittee.org

Limited run of commemorative Liliʻu shirt

    Design is on the front of a black T-shirt

For a limited time only we will be making the OFFICIAL commemorative 125th Illegal Overthrow of the Hawaiian Nation – Ma Hope Makou O Lili’ulani T-shirt available for a donation of $20 to Ka Lahui Hawai’i. Add $5 if you would like it mailed to you directly. Text to 1-808-372-2512 with your order, name, and mailing address. We only printed a limited number of shirts.
**NEW if you go to https://kalahuihawaiipoliticalactioncommittee.org/740-2/ and make a $25 donation we will mail you a shirt. Provide us with confirmation of donation, shirt size and mailing address at klhpoliticalactioncommittee@gmail.com**